a
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
CORONAVIRUS
Latest Advice
Symptoms
The most common symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) are recent onset of:
  • New continuous cough and/or
  • High temperature
  • loss or change to your sense of smell or taste  

For most people, coronavirus (COVID-19) will be a mild illness If you have coronavirus symptoms:
  • Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital
  • You do not need to contact 111 to tell them you're staying at home
  • Testing for coronavirus is not needed if you're staying at home
  • Plan ahead and ask others for help to ensure that you can successfully stay at home and consider what can be done for vulnerable people in the household
  • Ask your employer, friends and family to help you to get the things you need to stay at home
  • Wash your hands regularly for 20 seconds, each time using soap and water, or use hand sanitiser
  • If you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home, or your condition gets worse, or your symptoms do not get better after 7 days, then use the NHS 111 online coronavirus service. If you do not have internet access, call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999
  • Visit NHS 111 Online for more information

Stay at Home
  • If you live alone and you have symptoms of coronavirus illness (COVID-19), however mild, stay at home for 7 days from when your symptoms started. (See ending isolation section below for more information)
  • If you live with others and you or one of them have symptoms of coronavirus, then all household members must stay at home and not leave the house for 14 days. The 14-day period starts from the day when the first person in the house became ill
  • It is likely that people living within a household will infect each other or be infected already. Staying at home for 14 days will greatly reduce the overall amount of infection the household could pass on to others in the community
  • For anyone in the household who starts displaying symptoms, they need to stay at home for 7 days from when the symptoms appeared, regardless of what day they are on in the original 14 day isolation period. (See ending isolation section below for more information
  • If you can, move any vulnerable individuals (such as the elderly and those with underlying health conditions) out of your home, to stay with friends or family for the duration of the home isolation period
  • If you cannot move vulnerable people out of your home, stay away from them as much as possible
Find out more about UK Gov Coronavirus Response
Don't show this again
Shopping Cart
In Store
Total
Online
Total Excl VAT
VAT
Total
Checkout
Contact
Open Hours
LOGIN/LOGOUT
Vaccines
Destinations
BLOG
What we have to say about your health and well being
16
Jun 2014
Slap a 20% 'health tax' on fizzy drinks: Experts call for action to slash UK sugar intake
A tax could be put on fizzy drinks and biscuits could be emblazoned with health warnings in a new strategy to slash the nation’s sugar intake. A report commissioned by a Government agency says that targeting soft drinks would be an easy option in the war on sugar. It estimates that a 20 per cent tax on fizzy drinks – which would raise the price of a can from 70p to 84p – would cut the number of overweight Britons by more than a quarter of a million. Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt gives a keynote address during the Chief Nursing Officer for England's Summit 2013 at the Hilton Metropole, Birmingham. Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is under pressure to hike fizzy drinks' cost to tackle the growing obesity crisis. The leaked paper, which was written by heart doctors and health researchers, comes just weeks after the Chief Medical Officer Dame Sally Davies warned that a ‘sugar tax’ may be necessary to tackle the country’s obesity epidemic. Figures show that British girls are the fattest in Europe, with almost a third overweight or obese. Around two thirds of adults are overweight or obese. The ‘options for action’ document, which was prepared for Public Health England, identifies six possible ways of reducing sugar intake: a tax on sugary drinks; foods being reformulated to contain less sugar; a cut in portion sizes; advertising rules being tightened; health warnings on sugary products; and encouraging farmers to grow fruit and vegetables instead of sugar beet. The draft report describes sugary soft drinks as ‘low-hanging fruit’ – or an easy target – and says a 20 per cent sugar tax would reduce obesity rates by 1.3 per cent. It argues that the move would have public support, ‘especially when health benefits are emphasised’. The paper, obtained by The Grocer magazine, is expected to form the basis of a report to be published on June 26. Public Health England said the Government had asked for its advice but any decision would lie with ministers. The Department of Health said it currently had no plans for a sugar tax. Coca-Cola Life, a naturally-sweetened drink with a third less sugar and calories than its regular cola which will be launched later in the year Campaigners say people need to learn how to enjoy drinks that do not taste sweet - whether loaded with sugar or sweeteners - because at the moment we are 'drinking spoonfuls of sugar' Coca-Cola Life (left), is a new naturally-sweetened drink with a third less sugar and calories than regular fizzy drinks and will be launched in the new year. But health campaigners say people need to learn how to enjoy drinks that do not taste sweet - whether loaded with sugar or sweeteners - because at the moment we are 'drinking spoonfuls of sugar', A can of Coca Cola or Pepsi contains nine teaspoons of sugar - or 35g. This is almost half of the maximum recommended daily intake of sugar. A can of Coca Cola or Pepsi contains nine teaspoons of sugar - or 35g. This is almost half of the maximum recommended daily intake of sugar.
CONTACT
5 Monaghan Street, Co Down
Newry
County Armagh
BT35 6BB
0044 (0) 28 3026 2110
Contact Us
INFORMATION
Premises GPhC Number:
tba
OPENING HOURS
Cookie Policy
Privacy Policy
Terms And Conditions
Copyright 2019